Facts about grasshoppers

Facts about grasshoppers and crickets

  • A Grasshopper can leap 20 times the length of its own body. If you or I could do that, we would be able to jump almost 40 yards.
  • A typical grasshopper weighing 2-3 gm will thrust against the ground with a force which peaks at about 30 gms when the legs are half extended, to give it a final take-off velocity of about 3 m.s-1.
  • Swarming grasshoppers (locusts) ┬ácan do severe damage to crops. There are more than 20,000 species of grasshoppers known to science, but only about a dozen of these form damaging swarms.
  • Swarms can contain billions of locusts, covering hundreds of square miles in the worst cases) and eat just about every green thing they encounter.
  • One swarm in 1988 covered an area of 75 x 15 miles, contained (about) 150 billion locusts and was estimated to be eating 300,000 tons fresh green food per day.
  • Male crickets sing by rubbing a comb-like structure with a row of teeth on the inside of the hind leg against a ridge on the wing.
  • Short horned grasshoppers have ears in the sides of the abdomen. Long-horned grasshoppers and crickets have ears in the knee-joints of their front legs.
  • The extensor muscle from the back leg of an adult female locust (Schistocerca gregaria) can develop a force of up to 1.4 kg. This means that the muscle from one back leg of a grasshopper can lift almost a bag-and-a-half of supermarket sugar!
  • When a grasshopper is picked up, they “spit” a brown liquid
  • Did you know that you can tell the temperature by counting cricket chirps? Here’s how you do it. Go outside at dusk or at night and find a chirping cricket. Count the number of chirps it makes during a 15-second period. Then, add 40 to the number of chirps. The total will be pretty close to what the actual temperature is in Fahrenheit.
  • Crickets eat just about anything — they’re omnivorous. You’ll find them in your garden eating rotten tomatoes and other debris. They’ll even eat other insects, including each other. They can also get into your house and eat paper, clothes, or anything else they feel like eating.
  • Salvador Dali had a pathological fear of grasshoppers